Group EOS D First Impressions Review PhotographyBLOG blog

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This month Canon celebrates 30 years of its EOS system. The company has invested a lot in the system over those years, launching almost 100 film and digital EOS cameras and over 100 EF lenses.
To mark the a
iversary, Canon UK has held meet-ups to showcase EOS cameras old and new. Photography Blog was invited to an event in the Aldwych disused underground station in London for a hands on with one of the companyu2019s latest EOS cameras, the EOS 800D.
Alongside the launch of the EOS 800D, Canon a
ounced the EOS 77D and the mirrorless EOS M6. A pre production model of the EOS M6 was available to see at the event but not for a proper hands on. We will provide sample images as soon as the EOS M6 becomes available.
With so many EOS DSLRs available today, Canon has the entire range split into begi
er, enthusiast and professional groups – which is helpful because the names and numbering system of the cameras has become rather confusing.
The EOS 800D sits at the top of the begi
er range of DSLRs, while the EOS 77D at the base of the enthusiast range. The focus here is on our first impressions of the EOS 800D after good use with the camera.
Features
Under the hood, the EOS 800D has an impressive feature set for itu2019s price point and the EOS 77D has essentially the same key features:
24.2MP APS-C-size CMOS sensor (1.6x crop factor)
DIGIC 7 processor
ISO 100-25,600 range that can be expanded to ISO 51,200
45 cross-type AF points
Dual Pixel CMOS AF
1/4000-30sec mechanical shutter
6fps burst shooting (JPEG burst until card is full)
Full HD video recording at up to 60fps
EF/EF-S lens mount”

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musthave adornments for each Canon DSLR proprietor TechRadar

“Whether youu2019ve just got yourself a Canon DSLR like the EOS 1300D / EOS Rebel T6 or 750D / Rebel T6i, or have owned one for a while, the camera and the bundled 18-55mm kit lens it just the start.
The beauty of investing in a DSLR is that while they can be used straight out of the box, thereu2019s a world of accessories out there to help you really harness their power and take even better shots.
These include additional lenses, filters, tripods and a host of other accessories. But with so much choice, where to begin? Weu2019ll point you towards some of the key items of kit youu2019re likely to want to invest in, and offer suggestions for each.
1. Standard prime: Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM | A
While your 18-55mm kit lens is fine for general photography, its relatively ‘slow’, in that the maximum aperture available is quite limited. Thatu2019s where a prime lens comes in. Often offering a much faster maximum aperture, they let in more light, allowing you to shoot handheld in much poorer lighting conditions. Not only that, but the faster maximum aperture means you can achieve pro-looking shallow depth of field effects to isolate your subject.
They come in a range of focal lengths, but our pick would be the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM | A; giving roughly the same field of view as the human eye on a Canon APS-C DSLR, itu2019s whatu2019s termed a u2018standardu2019 prime. A must for any photographer.
Read more: 9 things you should know about prime lenses
2. Telephoto zoom: Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD
The next lens youu2019ll probably want to add to your collection is a telephoto zoom. Not only are these perfect for action and wildlife photography, theyu2019re also great for picking out details in landscapes and shooting tightly cropped portraits or candids.
While pros tend to favour the 70-200mm f/2.8 telephoto zoom, theyu2019re heavy and expensive, which is why weu2019ve picked the Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD.
Offering more reach than a 70-200mm, while also being more compact and affordable, this is a great choice for those looking to pull in even distant subjects u2013 and it comes with Vibration Control (Tamronu2019s anti-shake system) built in.
Read more: The best telephoto zoom lenses for Canon DSLRs
3. Wide-angle zoom: Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM
Youu2019ve probably found that your Canon 18-55mm u2018kitu2019 lens is pretty wide, but not quite wide enough for some subjects.
An ultra wide-angle zoom lens can offer a field of view almost be twice as wide, making it perfect for cramped interiors, big city landmarks, sweeping landscapes and surreal close-ups.
Our pick would be Sigmau2019s 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM, but itu2019s worth remembering that this lens is only compatible with APS-C cameras, so if youu2019re pla
ing to upgrade to a full-frame camera later youu2019ll have to trade this lens in as well.
Read more: The best wide-angle zoom lenses for Canon DSLRs”

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