New Digital Posters Trace the History of Pentax Cameras Popular Photography Magazine

“Whether youu2019re a diehard Pentaxian or just a gear-head who loves posters, youu2019ll appreciate these free downloads from Ricoh. The first poster is a no-nonsense grid of Pentax cameras from 1959 through today, while the second poster is a bit more deliberately designed as a zigzagging timeline punctuated by decade.
Youu2019ll find a number of Pentaxu2019s greatest hits in each lineup, including its original 1979 and later 1990 release of their popular 6×7 medium-format SLRu2014a favorite of pro’s like Peter Hurley and a rare bird among cameras of that format. Many seasoned photographers might fondly recall 1975u2019s Pentax K1000, a fully manual 35mm camera that was a mainstay among students. In among the better-known cameras, youu2019ll also find fun anomalies such as the Auto 110 Super, which was an interchangeable-lens system for 110 film, popular in the 1980s and now virtually defunct.”

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Sigma Introduces New Professional Lenses for Canon Nikon Huffington Post

“Sigma has just released 4 new professional lenses hot on the heals of the absolutely amazing Sigma 85mm F1.8 Art we just reviewed. All will be compatible with Sigma Optimization Pro software and the Sigma USB dock for updating the lenses and configuration. They are also a
ounced with availability for Canon EF, Nikon, and Sigma mounts. Sony users can utilize the Sigma MC-11 Sony E mount converter to use the Canon EF version for Sony E mount cameras. Currently there has been no a
ouncement for Sony A mount systems. Pre-orders, timelines, cost and more information is on the way so check back soo
nSigma 24-70 F2.8 OS Art
Sigma 24-70 F2.8 OS Art
Alrightu2026time for some honesty. Iu2019ve been looking forward to this lens for years. Canon has for some reason neglected to but image stabilization in its F2.8 zoom lenses while everyone else has been pushing this technology. Unfortunately, some of the other options lacked the quality that Sigmau2019s ART series lenses have been employing over the last few years. Well now we have the Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Art lens that will hopefully bring this all together. Boasting optical image stabilization, rounded 9-blade aperture diaphragms, multiple elements to reduce chromatic and spherical aberration as well as color fringing and distortion, plus a high speed and quiet autofocus system. Sigmau2019s lens dock will allow for firmware updates as well as lens customization. Pre-orders, timelines, cost and more information is on the way so check back soon.
Preorder: coming soon”

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3D printing: A new catalyst for learning

3D printing: A new catalyst for learning

Every progressive educational institution and a creative teacher endeavours to optimise collaboration between students and teachers, constantly on the search for better ways to enhance the learning process.

Inevitable technological advancements have inched its way into every aspect of our lives, an

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Tools 3D printed using mock-up Mars dust

Dust and rock particles that mimic regolith on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars have been turned into 3D printer inks, offering a glimpse into how humans might one day use local materials in situ to construct and maintain extraterrestrial outposts.

3D printing approaches have already been demonstr

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3D Printing of Glass Now Possible

Glass is one of mankind’s oldest materials. It was used as far back as in ancient Egypt and ancient Rome and has found a place now also in manufacturing technology of the 21st century. An interdisciplinary team at the KIT led by mechanical engineer Dr. Bastian E. Rapp developed a process using glass

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Ocue Colorado is Canons first UVgel wideformat printer PrintWeek printweekcom

“By Tania Mason, Monday 13 March 2017 Be the first to comment
The first of Canon Europeu2019s new range of wide-format printers to incorporate the new Canon UVgel technology will be unveiled at Fespa in May, after being trailed at PrintWeekLive! last week.
Aimed at businesses that produce indoor and outdoor applications such as posters, ba
ers, signage, POS, billboards, window graphics, and decals, the Ocu00e9 Colorado 1640 is a 64in (1.6m) roll-to-roll wide-format printer built around Canonu2019s patented UVgel curable ink system.
It boasts a top speed of 159sqm/hr for billboards or outdoor ba
ers u2013 faster, Canon claims, than any other printer in this market segment u2013 and a top speed for highest-quality, close-up indoor applications of 40sqm/hr.”

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Salida man captured after revealed driveby shooting occurrence Canon City Daily Record

“Juancarlos Giraldo
A Salida man was arrested Monday after he allegedly executed a drive-by shooting in the 1200 block of Short Street in Cau00f1on City, according to a news release Wednesday.
A news release from the Fremont County Sheriff’s Office stated Juancarlos Giraldo, 31, allegedly shot at a home while driving in his vehicle. People reportedly were outside of the home at the time. No injuries were reported.
FCSO responded after the caller stated, “a person had driven by the caller’s home, fired a shot while the caller and the caller’s family were outside their home.””

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Standard EOS M survey Canons best CSC yet Expert Reviews

“Digital SLRs still dominate among professional photographers and amateur enthusiasts of a certain age, but those who grew up with Thundercats instead of Thunderbirds are more likely to own a compact system camera (CSC). Also known as mirrorless cameras, theyu2019re smaller and lighter than SLRs, tend to be better for video, can match SLRs for image quality and increasingly beat them for performance.
Canon dipped a late and rather apprehensive toe into the CSC market with the EOS M back in 2012. It was essentially an EOS 650D SLR squeezed into a point-and-shoot body and stuck permanently in live view mode, which meant dire performance.
Five years later, Canonu2019s SLRs are much faster in live view mode, thanks to its Dual Pixel technology, which incorporates phase-detect autofocus directly on the image sensor. Itu2019s a good omen for the firm’s latest CSC, the Canon EOS M5.
It isn’t cheap, though. At u00a31,050 for the body only, u00a31,150 with a 15-54mm kit lens or u00a31,400 with the 18-150mm lens we were sent for review, it goes head to head with some highly capable CSCs including the Panasonic GH4, Sony a6300 and Fujifilm X-T20 (review coming soon). In such distinguished company, Canon canu2019t afford to slip up.
READ NEXT: The best cameras of 2017 – our favourite snappers
Canon EOS M5 review: Ergonomics and controls
The M5 looks like an ultraslim SLR rather than a bloated compact camera, and itu2019s all the better for it. The electronic viewfinder is mounted centrally, just above the lens, which feels comfortable and familiar. The outer shell is made from plastic rather than magnesium alloy but it feels reassuringly solid. Iu2019d have preferred a slightly chunkier handgrip and at this price a bit of weather sealing doesnu2019t seem unreasonable. Otherwise, it looks and feels like a proper enthusiast’s camera.
The electronic viewfinder is a high quality 2.4-million dot OLED unit but itu2019s smaller than rival CSCu2019s viewfinders. Canon doesnu2019t publish a magnification value but Iu2019d estimate that itu2019s around 0.6x. The LCD touchscreen is bigger and sharper than usual, at 3.2in and 1.6 million dots. It tilts up by 90 degrees and down by 180 for self-portraits, although thatu2019s not so useful if youu2019re using a tripod. When tilted upwards, the eye-level sensor often mistook my finger for an eye and automatically switched the screen off and enabled the viewfinder.
Touch & Drag AF is Canonu2019s new name for a great feature that seemed to have appeared by accident on the EOS 750D. When using the viewfinder, the screen is off but it can still be used as a touchscreen to move the autofocus point. This is much quicker than nudging it around with buttons or a mini joystick. The M5 takes this feature to its logical conclusion, with options to make the changes absolute or relative; the latter behaves more like a laptop touchpad than a touchscreen, with adjustments made by swiping the screen. Itu2019s also possible to enable only half or quarter of the screen, thereby eliminating accidental adjustments when your nose touches the surface of the display.”

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Confounded About Where the New Canon D Fits Then Watch This Video Fstoppers

“When Canon a
ounced the 77D as part of their Valentineu2019s day gift to photographers, many were left scratching their heads u2013 Where does it fit in the lineup? Is it an amped up Rebel T6s or a toned down 80D? Wait, there was even a camera called the T6s? To answer that second question, itu2019s a little bit of both. A video from ZY Productions does a great job explaining the differences between the 80D and the 77D. Many aspirational photographers want to step up to the 80D but donu2019t have the extra cash. So what do you give up for the $200 price difference? Are you getting a Rebel in all but name, or is this really a true double-digit u201cDu201d camera in the EOS lineup? Hereu2019s a quick rundown of the key differences from the video (and then some):
The Good
Price: Body price is $899 vs. $1099 for the 80D.
DIGIC 7 Processor vs. DIGIC 6 u2013 usually this means improvements in image quality and processing, though the imaging pipeline is similar to the 80D and most average users probably wonu2019t be able to tell the difference. This is probably responsible for the increased native ISO range to 25600 (compared to 16000 on the 80D)
Max burst shooting capacity is higher than 80D (190 vs 77 raw, unlimited vs. 110 JPG), but some of that is due to the slower burst rate.”

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Standard GX Mark II audit TrustedReviews

“What is the Canon G7X Mark II?
The Canon G7X Mark II sits in Canonu2019s premium range of compact cameras. Itu2019s intended to appeal to those who want a device that offers a high level of control and excellent image quality, but slots into your pocket. It could be seen as a travel compact for those who own bigger cameras, such as a DSLR or CSC.
Itu2019s an upgrade on the G7X, bringing a series of relatively small but useful updates u2013 although it retains the same sensor and lens as its predecessor. It features manual control and raw format shooting, making it particularly appealing to enthusiasts.
Canon G7X Mark II u2013 Design and Handling
There are currently five different models in Canonu2019s G range of premium compact cameras. The G7X Mark II, in terms of body shape, sits alongside the G9X in offering a premium set of specifications in a pocket-friendly body. While the G9X is even smaller than this offering, the slightly bigger body means you get a tilting screen, and a longer lens.
In order to keep the size down, other trade-offs have also been made. You donu2019t get a fully articulating screen and, crucially, there’s no viewfinder either. If you’re an enthusiast photographer used to shooting with a DSLR or high-end CSC then this is likely to be something youu2019ll miss. If it’s particularly problematic, you can opt for the G5X instead.
The overall design of the G7X Mark II is pretty sleek, if arguably a little on the utilitarian side. Thereu2019s a useful grip on the front of the camera that helps it sit snugly in the hand.
Atop the camera is a dial for quickly moving between the different exposure modes on offer, while just beneath it sits an exposure compensation dial that can be very easily reached by your thumb for making quick changes.”

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Group Q A CP Canons fan mirrorless desires the eventual fate of K and all the more imaging asset

“Canon Q&A @ CP+ 2017: Canonu2019s enthusiast mirrorless aspirations, the future of 4K and more

Photography giant Canon is always big news at the a
ual CP+ tradeshow in its native Japan. Our founder and publisher Dave Etchells is at the show, and had the opportunity to discuss a number of topics with Canon executives at CP+ 2017. Representing Canon were Go Tokura, Executive Officer and Chief Executive of the company’s Image Communication Business Operations; Yoshiyuki Mizoguchi, group executive within the ICB Products Group, Image Communication Business Operations; and Goshi Nakamura, Manager; Marketing, Camera and Video Business Pla
ing Div., Imaging Technology & Communication Group, Canon U.S.A. Inc. And while they couldn’t discuss the company’s future products — something that’s par for the course in executive interviews like these — both gentlemen nevertheless had plenty of insights to share, especially regarding Canon’s view of the mirrorless camera market and its place within it.
The recent Canon EOS M5 and newly-a
ounced EOS M6 both include Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus systems, and Canon enlightened us as to the challenges associated with bringing this technology to new cameras while still maintaining the desired price point. And there are similar challenges regarding the implementation of 4K video, particularly in more affordable cameras, an area in which the company again provided some very interesting insights.
Additional topics of discussion included the dedicated video camera market and the future of the PowerShot line. We even learned which advanced PowerShot cameras are number one and number two in sales in the United States! Will the answer surprise you? Read on to find out…
Dave Etchells/Imaging Resource: Some analysts have noted Canon’s relatively slow entry into the mirrorless market and felt that it was over a concern about ca
ibalizing or reducing existing DSLR sales, but on the other hand there are many competitors moving very strongly in that space. How do you see mirrorless fitting into Canon’s overall strategy generally? And are we likely to see more emphasis going forward, or do you view mirrorless as continuing to be more of a niche market rather than DSLR sales?
Yoshiyuki Mizoguchi
Group Executive
ICB Products Group
Image Communication Business Operations
Canon Inc.
Yoshiyuki Mizoguchi/Canon Inc.: So in terms of how we look at the mirrorless market, I think there’s a regional variance that we can actually point out at the moment. Different regions have different penetrations in mirrorless market share. For example, if you look at Japan, it’s a 50/50 [share between DSLR and mirrorless]. And we actually saw the penetration growing, but having said that, in the last couple of years that has sort of settled down into just a 50/50 [split]. So we’re looking [at] this as rather than mirrorless taking over or maybe there’s a great shift back to SLR, we see that there’s a nice sort of a coexistence of the markets, and that’s how we see it. And the different markets will have a different breakdown in ratios.
DE: Ah, yes.
YM: As you know, Canon offers both mirrorless and SLR products, and we will continue to do this. We will position those categories in that regard, and we would like to look at the ILC market as a whole to respond to the wide range of demands that are coming in with these two prongs.
But having said that, out of all of our lineup at the moment, I think that the EOS [Kiss] X-series [aka the EOS Rebel series in US markets), it’s about really offering a light, small camera, and we’re answering that demand. I think that was a broad play for for a number of years, but in the last couple of years with the introduction of the M5 and M6, we are seeing that the EOS series will have more of a role to play, in addition to being small [and] lightweight. There’s a greater demand for the mirrorless market, as you can see that Japan is 50/50 at the moment. Other regions are seeing more demand as well. So it’s [up to] us to respond to this diversifying demand for the mirrorless market.
DE: As you mentioned the mirrorless market is broadening, and with the EOS M5 Canon is now finally offering a true enthusiast-level mirrorless camera with many features those users demand. But looking at the EF-M lens lineup, there are a wide range of focal lengths available, but they feel much more consumer-focused. We’re wondering whether you see higher-end — if not professional — more enthusiast-level lenses on the roadmap for the EOS M family?
YM: I won’t be able to disclose any sort of future products, so there’s not much details that I can provide at the moment, but obviously there’s a growing demand for the enthusiast-level cameras. That’s why we’re seeing this progression of our camera series, and in a similar way we will start to see the strong demand for the lenses as well, for the enthusiast. We are looking at the market demand and seeing what sort of levels that we’re seeing, and we will probably be introducing products along with that.
The Canon EOS M6 mirrorless camera, shown here in its silver variant.
DE: Moving to Dual Pixel autofocus, we were very excited to see that Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology has been implemented in the EOS M5. (And we say that with an exclamation point!)

DE: It’s taken a while for this feature to make its way to the EOS M system. Were there any technical challenges or limitations that prevented you from including Dual Pixel on earlier EOS M cameras like the M2 and M3, or was it more a matter of the technology needing to mature to bring costs down?
YM: Dual Pixel CMOS AF was introduced [in the] 70D, but at the time we did have both the points that you mentioned. We had a technical challenge that we had to overcome, as well as the cost implications that it would incur as well. So it was two things that forbade us from introducing the EOS, but luckily we were able to evolve and we were able to advance, and so that’s why we were able to introduce it in the M5.”

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Survey Sybarite The Cliburn Live Oak Music Hall Lounge TheaterJones Performing Arts News

“Photo: Brian David Braun Sybarite5
Fort Worth u2014 For the past few seasons, The Cliburn has presented a couple of shows a year at The Live Oak Music Hall & Lounge. It has been great opportunity to hear crossover music in a casual, jazz-club-like atmosphere, in a series called the Cliburn Sessions. With this weeku2019s a
ouncement that The Live Oak will close at the end of April, however, this partnership comes to an end.
Thursdayu2019s return engagement by Sybarite5, a string quintet, was thus the last of the Sessions concerts to be held at The Live Oak. Sybarite5, comprised of Sami Merdinian and Sarah Whitney, violins, Angela Pickett, viola, Laura Metcalf, cello, and Louis Levitt, bass, last visited Fort Worth, and The Live Oak, a bit over two years ago. On their return, there was considerable overlap with the repertoire they performed on their prior visit: Elgaru2019s Elegy, some Armenian folk songs, a Piazzolla tango, some Radiohead. (The ensemble has recorded an all-Radiohead album.)
As before, they a
ounced all works from the stage, but posted a set list on their website (for which this critic is grateful). Highlights that were new to this yearu2019s program included two wi
ers of a composition contest in which composers wrote works specifically for Sybarite5. These included Steven Snowdenu2019s u201cTraveler 65,u201d inspired by, as the quintet a
ounced, u201ca chimpanzee in space.u201d (Presumably this is Ham, a chimp sent into space by NASA in 1961. He has his own Wikipedia page.) Snowdenu2019s piece used a variety of extended techniques to replicate, evidently, the anxiety of Hamu2019s experience. These included lots of Bartu00f3k pizzicato, in which the strings are snapped, and mutes made from crumpled aluminum foil, which create a decidedly unpleasant hiss and pop.”

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